ericsysmin's DevOps Blog

Accessing Raw Files on Authenticated GitLab

Accessing Raw Files on Authenticated GitLab

Recently, I started working on more repositories on GitLab. One of the common items in my Ansible testing is the use of URL lookups in the templating of my Dockerfiles in Molecule. There’s a completely different method which requires the use of the GitLab API endpoints that require different formatting and token auth. The details for this can be found here: https://docs.gitlab.com/ee/api/repository_files.html#get-raw-file-from-repository

Searching around I did find that you can pass the token via the private_token parameter to the url.

Because you need to include the folder directory as an encoded value, I had to do lots of trial and error to figure out how to do complicated strings.

Formats like this, DO NOT WORK:

But after a series of attempts, THIS WORKS:

Some explanations of my findings urlencode filter did not work when used inline in the lookup, it made no changes to the file path. To separate, I had to split it out into a jinja set to set the var to a string that included the value using format() jinja filter, then take the result and create an encoded path to meet the encoded requirements of GitLab’s API.

 

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Configuring Docker Desktop on WSL2

Configuring Docker Desktop on WSL2

First steps, you’ll need to install and configure WSL2. To install WSL2 you can use the Microsoft Store or follow these instructions: https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/install

Then to install Docker to run on Windows and WSL2 you’ll need to follow these instructions: https://docs.docker.com/desktop/wsl/

During some testing and trying to simplify my WSL2 environment I stumbled upon an annoying issue that prevented me from running docker ps each time I attempted to run docker ps I’d receive the following error.

To get around this issue you’ll need to run the following commands:

Once those are ran you should be able to run docker without hitting permissions errors.

Those commands are adding/ensuring that the docker group exists and adding your existing user to the docker group. It then modifies the docker.sock to allow the docker group access to the socket.

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How to Install Pyenv on MacOS

Steps to install Pyenv on MacOS

There are a few ways on MacOS to install Python. You can install it via Brew, or by using Pyenv. After needing to switch between different versions of Python often I’ve decided to move to Pyenv. Prior to these steps I removed all versions of Python installed directly with Brew.

1. Update Brew and install prerequisites
We will need to update brew.

In some cases when installing Python >=3.12.1 we will need ncurses. If it’s missing you can install using:

2. Install Pyenv using brew

The recommended way to install pyenv on MacOS is brew.

3. Brew doctor fix

If you want to avoid brew doctor warning about “config” scripts existing outside the system or Homebrew directories please include the following in your shell.

4. Configure your Zsh profile.

If you wish to use Pyenv in non-interactive shells, add the following:

5. Restart shell

6. Install python 3.12

I am going to show how to install python 3.12 but you can select any version of your choice.

7. Switch between your python versions

pyenv shell <version> – modifies python for the current shell session

pyenv local <version> – modifies the python used in the current directory (or subdirectories)

pyenv global <version> – modifies the python used for your user account

 

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How to Install Pyenv on Ubuntu 22.04

Due to the slowness of repositories or even lack thereof being updated with specific versions of Python, I’ve decided to move some of my environments over to Pyenv to allow me to dynamically install and configure Python specifically for my environment. As it turns out this will also allow VS Code to allow me to choose the version of Python that I’d like to use when testing. So, here’s a quick guide to installing Pyenv on Ubuntu 22.04

Steps to install Pyenv on Ubuntu 22.04

1. Update and Install Dependencies

We need to ensure our package cache is updated, and then install the dependencies to download, and build Python from Pyenv.

2. Install Pyenv using pyenv-installer

3. Configure user profile to use pyenv

Ensure the following is in your ~/.bash_profile (if exists), ~/.profile (for login shells), ~/.bashrc (for interactive shells), or ~/.zshrc

Optionally enable pyenv-virtualenv

4. Reload your profile

5. Install python using pyenv

6. Set your python version

pyenv shell <version>  — select just for current shell session
pyenv local <version>  — automatically select whenever you are in the current directory (or its subdirectories)
pyenv global <version>  — select globally for your user account

7. Validate your installation of python

or

 

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Installing ZSH on WSL: Ubuntu

Installing ZSH on WSL: Ubuntu

Having moved away from development of Ansible/Python/Terraform, and others on Windows a few years ago. I’ve heard that WSL has become much better, especially with its support of VS Code now that they have a WSL connector. So, I decided to give it a try.

However, I did run into one surprising inconvenience, BASH! I have become so accustomed to ZSH over the years on Apple and using oh-my-zsh that all my shortcuts and quick ways to doing things just weren’t there.

I did attempt to use oh-my-bash but there just aren’t the number of plugins already to support the plethora of plugins I need and use on a regular basis. So, next logical step is to install ZSH on my WSL: Ubuntu system.

Requirements

WSL with Ubuntu installed

Steps to install ZSH

  1. Install ZSH.
  2. Verify that ZSH has been installed on the system.
  3. Set ZSH as your default shell.
    NOTE: This used to require modifications to the shortcut to access WSL but in newer versions of WSL you can use the following.

    For older versions you will need to modify the shortcut to WSL and use the command:

  4. Once you close and reopen your WSL Ubuntu shell you should now be in ZSH shell.
    zsh-shell-screenshot

Install of Oh-my-zsh

  1. Ensure that your terminal session is open and use the following command as per https://ohmyz.sh/#install
  2. You should now be able to configure your oh-my-zsh installation by modifying your .zshrc file and enable any plugins you need.
  3. The final result! 🙂 

    Screenshot of oh-my-zsh on WSL: Ubuntu

 

Hopefully that helps, I know it helped me as I venture back to Windows for development of my Ansible playbooks and other tools.

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